Change
language
  • English/
  • Chinese Simplified/
  • French/
  • Gaelic/
  • Arabic/
  • Polish/
  • Punjabi/
  • Russian/
  • Spanish/
  • Romanian/
  • Urdu/
  • Other languages...
Accessibility
help

ASL Review update

OK, the ASL Review might not sound like the most exciting thing in the world – but here’s why it’s really important!

What is the ‘ASL REview’?

If you are at school and you need extra help, this is called additional support for learning (ASL).

Back in 2019, a person called Angela Morgan was asked by the Scottish Government to find out how well additional support for learning (ASL) works in schools.

So Angela spoke to lots of different people, including children and young people. She asked them what works well, what doesn’t work well and what could be changed.

Afterwards, all of the information gathered was written into a report. This was called ‘Support for Learning: All Our Children and All Their Potential‘ – but most people call it ‘the ASL Review’ for short. 

Why is it important?

In the ASL Review, Angela Morgan made recommendations for what should happen next in order to make things better for pupils in Scotland. These became an ‘action plan’ which basically outlines the next steps to make her recommendations happen.

This whole process is important because every child and young person in Scotland has the right to support and education.

In summary, what the ASL Review highlighted is that some things need to improve to make sure this right becomes a reality for every pupil in Scotland.

As a result, making these improvements will help improve the lives of children and young people – like you – across Scotland.

So, what’s the latest?

In 2022 the Scottish Government shared an update on the things that they have done so far. This short video tells you about what they said:

If you’d like to read the full update, you can visit the Scottish Government website by hitting the button below.

What happens next?

Over the next 18 months, children and young people will be given more opportunities to have their say on different things, such as exams and assessments in school. If you are interested in finding out more about this and what the Inclusion Ambassadors think, then you can read our recent news post.

There are also plans to make the Children’s Rights in the UNCRC (United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child) part of Scots Law. You can find out more about what the UNCRC by visiting our UNCRC – Your Rights page:

More Information

Back
to top