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Accessibility
help

How your school can support your learning

HOW YOUR SCHOOL CAN SUPPORT YOUR LEARNING

Feel like you need help to access school and feel more included?

10 ways schools can support you

It’s important that your school listen to you and put support in place that meets your needs.

Here are some examples of the type of support schools can provide:

  1. Talking with you about the best way they can support you.
  2. Not only listen to you, but also take action on the things you talk about.
  3. Provide a space for you to go if you need some time out.
  4. Help with digital access so you can learn at home if you’re not able to be in school.
  5. Provide special equipment or technology that helps with your learning. You can find out more about technology here.
  6. Give you more time in exams. You can read more about support with exams here.
  7. Organise an interpreter to help you have your say.
  8. Provide support to get to school, like a taxi.
  9. Make sure there is someone to help you take medicine.
  10. Your school can work alongside other adults who are there to help you, like a social worker, therapist, advocate or other professional who is supporting you. You can find out more about the adults who can support you and your learning here.

Why does the right support at school matter?

“When school staff have an understanding of different additional support needs and can understand certain behaviours, it helps them understand why young people may act in a particular way”

Finlay, 12

STEPS YOU CAN TAKE IF YOU’RE NOT GETTING THE SUPPORT YOU NEED…

Need help to have your say ABOUT SUPPORT AT school?

If you are aged 12-15 and finding it hard to talk to your school about support, My Rights, My Say can help you. They support children to have their say and get the support they need at school.

An adult can put you in touch with My Rights, My Say or you can contact them yourself.

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